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SophiaZ
Mar 10, 2019
In NSDA Open
Securitization is an extreme form of politicization in which a state’s views of refugees turn from them being human beings into security threats. One instance of securitization in developed countries is the travel ban recently implemented by Trump. Targeting mostly Muslim countries, the travel ban indefinitely suspends the issuance of visas to those from the targeted countries. The initial intent of the travel ban was “to protect the Nation from terrorist activities,” as stated by the president. However, instead of the travel ban preventing terrorist activity, the travel ban turned into a form of securitization. According to the DHS’s findings, it echos a December 2016 report by the House Committee on Homeland Security, which concluded that the United States “faces its highest Islamist terror threat environment since 9/11, and much of the threat now stems from individuals who have been radicalized [in the US].” Even though this was just one example in a specific country, this demonstrates what could happen all around the world. As securitization happens, the impact on people who are in dire need for help, can be huge and overwhelmingly negative. 1. ) According to Emamzadeh, a psychologist, “the (travel) ban(which, as we have proven, is a kind of securitization) is likely to make life harder for those who have families and relatives in US, and ones who are escaping dictatorial regimes around the world—dreaming of making it to US to start a new life free from repression and discrimination. (Instead, they end up in a place where)the ban normaliz(es) and institutionaliz(es) the discrimination that they already face.” 2.) This isn’t just in the US. As according to the IRRI in 2017, (In Kenya, securitized narratives) have opened the door both to abuses in the name of advancing security and to exploitation of vulnerable individuals. It has left (Somalian) refugees feeling marginalized and discriminated against. (For them,) local integration cannot be openly discussed, and livelihoods are hard to come by; return to Somalia is hampered by still active militias, insecurity, corruption and poor governance; and resettlement numbers are tiny and only contracting."
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SophiaZ
Mar 03, 2019
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SophiaZ
Feb 24, 2019
In NSDA Open
Human rights (Kenny) International law (William) Racism (Sophia) Camps bad (Thomas) Family separation (Lucy) Travel ban (Anna) Global Responsibility (Sophia/Lucy)
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SophiaZ

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